Shanny “Mayhem” Howard

 

Shanny “Mayhem” Howard12380167_1055242737840105_2063141271_n

Name: Shanny “Mayhem” Howard Weight: 60-63.5kg Age: 29 Country: Australia Gym: Vikings Muay Thai Fight Record: 7 Fights 6 Wins 1 Loss

1: How long have you been training Muay Thai and why did you become a fighter?

I have been training just over a year. I first started training just for fitness but it was my Trainer Robbie Tidyman who suggested I should give fighting a go. So I started training in the fight classes and before I knew it I was having my first fight.

12386599_1055242774506768_2019970960_n2: What has been your biggest challenge as a fighter?

My biggest challenge so far would be dealing with being centre of attention in front of big crowds. The nerves before making the walk to the ring are huge for me. Once I am in the ring and touch gloves it all goes away it’s like nothing matters but just before walking out I have to control my nerves. I would much rather fight with no crowds, just myself my trainer & my opponent. But I am learning to deal with it and I am getting better slowly.

3: What drives you?10647818_1055242487840130_1311929338_n

When I first started I was the only female at the gym, I felt like I had to prove to myself to the other fighters. This only gave me more of a drive to never give up and be the best I could be plus also to beat the boy’s hahaha.

4: If you could fight on any promotion in the world what would it be and why?

I think anywhere in Thailand would be absolutely amazing but Lumpinee Stadium would defiantly have to be number 1. Just to be able to fight & show my skills in the home land of Muay Thai would be a blessing.

5: What is your favourite part of training?

12380551_1055242771173435_122339155_nI love everything about training from wrapping my hands to stretching down. To be able to push myself to the max, I just love it. Having everyone at the gym see me not giving up pushes them, which then pushes me even more.

6: How would you describe yourself as a fighter?

I am defiantly a front foot fighter, I want to be the one pushing the pace & making my opponents game plan go out the window. I have been told that I hit with “Man Power” which is quite rare for a female. But overall I am still so new to the sport, and have so much more to learn.

12398931_1055242114506834_1477358743_n7: What are 3 things people might not know about you……

I really enjoy cooking and baking which can be very bad when having to prepare and lose weight before a fight lol. I am a massive sucker for Christmas movies it doesn’t matter if they are kids, adults or the cheesiest movie out I could watch them over and over again, there awesome I love them. I am absolutely petrified of Grasshoppers & Toads. When I see them I freeze up & just go to mush. It can be very embarrassing to see how a child can pick it up & get rid of it for me while I scream and cry like a baby until it is gone.

8: Do you have any embarrassing fight or training moments?

Oh god well now this is embarrassing. It was my first demo fight & I just climbed over the top ropes & it gave me the biggest wedgie. I had to get my trainer to pick it out for me, everyone in the front row was laughing. I don’t know who was more embarrassed myself or Robbie but yes it was very embarrassing.

9: What are your fight plans for 2016?10428976_1055242691173443_1493591172_n

I am planning on it being be a big year for me. I recently tried out for the Amateur Australian Muay Thai Team & I was very lucky enough to come away with a gold medal and an invitation to represent Australia in Sweden in May 2016. I am also planning to have around 10 fights throughout the year in Muay Thai & Boxing. Maybe even a Title Fight.

10: Any advice for anyone wanting to give fighting a go?

Fighting is not for everyone you either love it or hate it. It’s not easy but it is very rewarding to see all your hard work payoff it is a great feeling. You also have to have complete trust in your trainer that they are matching you with an equal opponent, and the number one thing is to have belief in yourself. You will never know unless you give it a go, at the end of the day you only get out what you put in.

Anyone you would like to Thank:

I would like to say a big Thank You to Robbie Tidyman and Will Currie for believing in me 12399188_1055242434506802_2085458855_nand pushing me to my limits. Everyone from my Vikings Family you guys inspire me to give it my all every day I am very grateful. My family and friends for coming to watch and cheer me on even though my mum watches through her fingers most times but still travels to support me. A Big Thank you to my sponsors “Team Lion Heart Mongkons” Glenn Heart you have been amazing with promoting me and getting my name out there. Also for my beloved prajas. Last but not least Nutrition Warehouse for supplying me with all my nutritional needs at a great price.

My Page: https://www.facebook.com/Shanny-Mayhem-Howard-954572391240474/

Nutrition Warehouse: https://www.facebook.com/nutritionwarehouse/?fref=ts https://www.nutritionwarehouse.com.au/

Team Lion Heart Mongkons: https://www.facebook.com/LionHeartMongonk/?fref=nf

Vikings Muay Thai: https://www.facebook.com/Vikings-Muay-Thai-HQ-156043824590206/

 

Interview By Natasha Sky Feb 2016, photos supplied

Follow my fighter blog, interviews and fighting journey (HERE)

 

 

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Kelsie”Pitbull” Thompson

Kelsie Thompson12348216_760095024121089_343203904_n

Name: Kelsie Thompson Age: 16 Country: Australia Gym: Kaos Muay Thai gym Weight: 58-60 Fight record: 9f 4w 5l

1. How long have you been training Muay Thai and why did you become a fighter? I have been training in martial arts for 6 years and Muay Thai for 3 years. I had competed in amateur tournaments before I stepped into the ring for the first time in 2013 and didn’t know what to expect. My trainer Michael Reberger asked if I wanted to jump I the ring and give it a go. The training for the fight was nothing like I had experienced and ever since then I’ve loved the adrenalin and feeling fighting gives me.

2. What has been your biggest challenge as a fighter? My biggest challenge as a fighter would have to be balancing work, school work and training all at once. Somehow I manage to do all three and still get average grades and go to every single training session 5 nights a week.

12355100_760095004121091_283007736_n3. What drives you? What drives me is the fact that my opponent is training just as hard as me and wants to win just as bad as me and it makes me determined to train as hard as I can.

4. If you could fight on any promotion in the world what would it be and why? I would love to fight on Rebellion one day as it seems like such a professional show and the skill level shown from all the fighters that do get a chance to fight on it are incredible.

5. What is your favourite part of training? My favourite part of training would definitely have to be hitting the pads and the satisfaction of going home at the end of training and not being able to feel my body because I smashed that training session

6. How would you describe your self as a fighter? I would describe myself as aggressive when I need to be and coming forward at my opponent, hence the name pitbull

7. What are 3 things people might not know about you.. 1. I love the beach 2. I read way 12336125_760095074121084_1709469429_ntoo much 3. I have a twin sister (not identical though)

8. Do you have any embarrassing fight or training moments? Whenever I hop out of the ring and walk down the stairs to go to the back room I always swing my arms like a cowboy because if I don’t I will probably fall off the stairs and that would not be a fun time

9. What are your fight plans for this year? I have 2 possible fights in February and after that whatever my trainer had lined up for me, I haven’t had a fight since August so I’m keen to get back into the ring 10. Any advise for anyone wanting to give fighting a go? I say make sure you train hard and just get in their and give it a go, at the end of the day whether you win or lose it is a big feat getting in the ring and fighting another person

12312339_760095067454418_1144778708_nAnyone you would like to thank? I would like to thank my family for always supporting me and my desicions, I’d also like to thank my trainers Michael Reberger and Mark Ward for always pushing me to my limits at training and never giving up on me.

Athlete page (HERE)

Interview by Natasha Sky Feb 2016, Photos supplied

Follow my blogs, interviews and fighter journey (HERE)

 

Jacinta “Too Sweet” Paskalidis

Jacinta “Too Sweet” Paskalidis1797328_677750035623361_2100954560_n

Name: Jacinta Paskalidis Age: 21 Country: Australia Gym: North Melbourne Muay Thai Weight: 60-63 Fight record: 15 fights, 11 wins, 1 draw, 3 losses Titles : IKBF Australian Muay Thai title

1. How long have you been training Muay Thai and why did you become a fighter? I started training Muay Thai at 11 years old, and had my first amateur fight at 15, but once I turned 18 an allowed to fight at a professional level in Melbourne that what I did.

1601047_708321402566224_5586188842012517732_n2. What has been your biggest challenge as a fighter? The biggest challenge as a fighter would be accepting physical change that my body has and will be going through. As I started training and fighting quite young, I was physically still a child, fighting at lower weight class etc. And getting older naturally you grow and it was a hard to accept that I couldn’t make lower weight classes. There were a few doubts about if I could handle a heavier opponent than before. But understanding my body, and believing in my ability and having great support from my trainer allowed me to accept, learn and shape me as a fighter.

3. What drives you? What drives me is just to fight good clean fights, 12355272_1038143529584008_1053713471_nagainst great fighters. Fighting the best fighters allows me to constantly challenging and improve in any aspect of myself and as a fighter.

4. If you could fight on any promotion in the world what would it be and why? If I could fight on any promotion in the world it would probably be ‘lion fight’. Due to the great support of female fighters on the promotion, and having the best females on the show such as caley reece, and it would be amazing to follow in her footsteps.

12366674_1038143519584009_575823997_n5. What is your favourite part of training? Favourite part of training, that’s a hard one. I would have to say clinching, well when I’m not sore. Oh and when training has ended.

6. How would you describe your self as a fighter? As a fighter I would say I’m clam and collected, pick my shots. Style wise is depending on the strengths of other fighters, but I defiantly favour my boxing.

 

7. What are 3 things people might not know about you..12083802_1038143526250675_377304096_n

1. I’m currently completing my Masters of Exercise science (High performance)

2. I skateboard

3. I love One Direction!

8. Do you have any embarrassing fight or training moments? Oh, I have plenty! The list is an arms length!

9. What are your fight plans for next year? I’m currently in Thailand and have a few fights lined up for early next year. And just see how it goes from there.

10. Any advise for anyone wanting to give fighting a go? I would say, don’t worry about winning or losing, just go in there and have fun. It an experience that you will never forget, and a feeling that you cannot get from anything else.1911730_696035397128158_1209316656_n

Anyone you would like to thank? I would love thank my family and friends for the constant support, everyone at my home away from home Por Promin Muay Thai, and lastly my trainer Theo Goulesas.

Sponsors: Real food healthy body. http://www.rfhb.com.au Athlete page: https://www.facebook.com/jacintatoosweet Instagram: @Jayyypask

Interview By Natasha Sky Dec 2015, Photos Supplied

You can follow my Interviews, blogs and journey as a fighter (HERE)

Natasha Sky Professional Muay Thai Fighter

 

 

 

Loren Ellement From The Pit, W.A

Loren Ellement11944833_10153202768471359_52292599_n

Name: Loren Ellement Age:25 Country: Australia Gym: The Pit Weight: 52kg Fight record: 5w 1l

1. How long have you been training Muay Thai and why did you become a fighter? I have been training Muay Thai on and off since I was 18 but seriously for the last 2.. I become a fighter because I have always been competitive and always loved fighting from when I was young

2. What has been your biggest challenge as a fighter? Watching my diet lol and getting used to training at such a high intensity with top notch fighters I.e Roy wills Gary cairns

3. What drives you? I’m naturally sporty but the fact I felt a lot of people underestimated me I wanted to prove them wrong and also to be the best at my weight division one day because I know I have what it takes even if I have a few set backs on the way

11988583_10153203079986359_8296878426677932046_n4. If you could fight on any promotion in the world what would it be and why? Any show on live TV would be amazing!

5. What is your favourite part of training? Training with my good mates everyday we have a tight team and its always a laugh at training!

6. How would you describe your self as a fighter? I am a very adaptable fighter

7. What are 3 things people might not know about you..

1. I can drive road ranger trucks 2. I love riding road bikes/trail bikes 3. Muay Thai has turned my 11159460_10152902957046359_6996520427649762334_nlife around

8. Do you have any pre fight rituals? I have to be wearing my lucky crop top

9. What are your fight plans for the rest of the year? To fight as much as I can

10. Any advise for anyone wanting to give fighting a go? Go for it you only live once!!! Show the world what your made of

Anyone you would like to thank? Yes All the boys and girls at the pit especially Roy wills he has so much knowledge and takes time to help me as much as he can! Emma Rae graham for being my 10996665_10152940273801359_4902074866131145408_namazing best friend and staunch training partner! My mum and dad for always supporting me and Blair smith my boyfriend and coach and for putting up with my shit while I’m fight training haha

Interview By Natasha Sky Sept 2015, Photos supplied

You can follow My other Female fighter interviews, Blogs and journey as a Female fighter (HERE)

Natasha Sky-Professional Muay Thai Fighter

Jasmine Parr, Jr fighter From Australia

Jasmine Parr11944369_10153535835125792_547060896_n

Name: Jasmine Parr Age:12 Country: Australia Gym: Boonchu gym Weight: 39kg Fight record: 2 wins 2 draws 1 loss Titles: 0

1. How long have you been training Muay Thai and why did you become a fighter? I’ve been training Muay Thai for about 5 years. I started getting serious when I was 8. I wanted to fight like Mum and Dad. They are my inspiration to become a fighter.

2. What has been the hardest thing about being a fighter? The hardest thing is being John Wayne and Angie Parr’s daughter. I feel like that I have way more pressure on me to win. I also want to make my parents proud and I hate to disappoint them.

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3. Do you think Muay Thai is a good sport for young girls & why? I think Muay Thai is a great sport for everyone and anyone because it’s better than sitting in front of a TV or phone. I feel like girls my age need to do exercise for their mind and bodies. Also, it’s a great way of making new friends.

11944630_10153535844300792_1032102039_n4. If you could fight on any promotion in the world what would it be and why? I would probably want to fight on CMT and UFC! Muay Thai is my life and doing something that I love in a cage would be a great feeling!

5. What is your favourite part of training? Kids class is my favourite part of my training because I get to train with some of my best friends from school.

6. How would you describe your self as a fighter? I’m aggressive and I like to start hard from the start to finish.

7. What are 3 things people might not know about you..11948192_10153535835070792_2127224817_n

1. I’m afraid of elevators. 2. I love pickles. 3. I like to sing.

8. Do you have any pre fight rituals? I go to Boonchu Thai Restaurant after every weigh in.

9. What are your fight plans for the rest of the year? I have enough points for the Siam Cup belt and I want go fight for it in December.

10. Any advise for anyone wanting to give fighting a go? Just go to a gym that has nice people and don’t do it to “destroy” your opponent try and be competitive but have fun at the same time.

11948226_10153535839120792_203173795_nAnyone you would like to thank? I just want to thank my parents and friends for always believing in me when I didn’t at times and for my mum and dad for training and coaching me with everything.

I would like to thank Boonchu Thai in Broadbeach for always taking care of my family and feeding us! Jenkins Pilots for helping me and sponsoring me. AO Fight for sponsoring awesome crop tops and leggings custom with my name on them! Fight World for sponsoring my pink Gii PUMMA MMA gym in Burleigh for training me every week!11909900_10153535835295792_490424719_n

Interview By Natasha Sky, Sept 2015, Photos supplied

You can follow My other Female fighter interviews, Blogs and journey as a Female fighter (HERE)

Natasha Sky-Professional Muay Thai Fighter

Amanda Juniku, Jr Queensland Champion, Muay Thai Fighter

Name: Amanda Juniku Age: 15 Country: Australian with an Albanian background Gym: Modern 11717432_10206023082090009_6485956171037871912_oWarrior Muay Thai Weight: 52kgs Fight record: 8f 6w 2l 1ko Titles: WMC bantamweight FTR QLD title, WKBF bantamweight FTR QLD title.

1. How long have you been training Muay Thai and why did you become a fighter? I’ve been training for about 5 years now and I became a fighter because at the time my brother and sister were fighting and I really wanted to give it a go myself.

2. What has been your biggest challenge as a fighter? My biggest challenge has been to find the determination not to eat junk food while weight cutting, so hard not to, but I manage to resist the temptation.

3. What drives you? The thought of being a pro world champion someday! (Hopefully!)

905890_999886500028746_8156920455061497252_o4. If you could fight on any promotion in the world what would it be and why? I’d love to fight on pride and glory, because I’ve heard how much of a great show it is! 🙂

5. What is your favorite part of training? The part when we finish, just kidding haha, I really like clinch nights!

6. How would you describe your self as a fighter? I feel that I’m mentally strong and I don’t mind getting hit, I love to trade sometimes haha

7. What are 3 things people might not know about you..

1. I LOVE JUNK FOOD 2. I sleep a lot 3. I’m generally quite shy and awkward around new people, but once I get comfortable I never shut up hahah.

8. Do you have any pre fight rituals? Not really, but I do have this bamboo bracelet I wear 10850102_805843079477464_4734023418325627014_nbefore my fights.

9. What are your fight plans for the rest of the year? I’m looking into fighting in Thailand while I’m down there for 2 weeks in October, and I’ve also got a 4 woman lined up at the end of the year.

10. Any advise for anyone wanting to give fighting a go? I’d say totally go for it, it’s so fun!

10382454_944582558892474_28731190277549938_nAnyone you would like to thank? A lot of people actually! I’ll start off with my family, gym partners and my trainers! Especially Scott Moss and Sam Croke! id also like to thank my sponsors NRG bodysculpting, Sharon Richards photographics and BOLO fight gear Australia. Thanks to all these awesome people for the continuous support! 🙂

Interview By Natasha Sky Sept 2015, Photos from Facebook

You can follow My other Female fighter interviews, Blogs and journey as a Female fighter (HERE)

Natasha Sky-Professional Muay Thai Fighter

Over Training in Muay Thai

First of all A link to the meaning – Over training

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overtraining

You hear things like “over training is a myth” and you can’t over train. I don’t agree with that at all as i believe over training is a real thing especially in while living in Thailand. I’m no sports doctor and i know that everyone is different but i also know my body and i know when i need to rest and recover. I know that some people may use the term over training to slack off especially beginners who mentally haven’t learnt how far they can push their body. As an experienced fighter i feel that it is a very real thing. I’m currently training in Thailand where a daily training consists of 4-6km Run then 2-3hr Muay Thai training twice a day six days a week. When i run, i run to get fit, i push myself the whole way, i don’t just plod along at a walking pace, so when im done im really tired. At training i push 100% on everything i overtraining-symtompsdo, pad work, bag work and all the conditioning exercises. I normally clinch & spar with the hardest most experienced people in the gym which makes me work really hard the whole time. By the end of the training session im struggling to even put my shoes on to leave because i have given everything to the session, like it was the only session i had left! but it’s not, i have to come back and do it all over again in the afternoon and the next day and the day after that. When you are giving that much to every session it is physically and mentally impossible to keep it up 2x a day for 6 days. Yes i have seen people train the whole 2x a day 6 days a week but they don’t train at 100% they just coast through the sessions exerting less energy. I could do this if i wanted to but for me that is not what training is about. I prefer to go hard as i can then have a session or a day off then back to training and go as hard as i can again. Having a couple of sessions off a week or even a day off to reset and recover is very important to me because then i can train harder and retain more information when im there. For me being at the gym training when i have nothing left, no power, brain capacity to hold any information because im just so tired, just not wanting to be there is a waste of time for me and my trainer. It’s also the time you are most likely to get injuries or hurt in some way because you are not on your game. Yes some times you have those shitty days where your tired and not feeling it but they are the days you just push through, those days are different from the days where you really need to take a break and reset mentally and physically. After years of training and fighting im able to tell the difference in those days and also have the discipline to push through the lazy days. Taking a day off or a session off isn’t going to hinder your training, For me i think it makes me better because im going to training feeling fresh, having a good mind-set and being able to retain the information being taught. Some of the things i experience when i feel like i have over trained is fatigue, depression, whole body aching unable to do everyday tasks, loss of drive, mood swings, insomnia, restless legs syndrome and more. When you feel this way i think its stupid to push your body anymore and risk the serious effects just for one days training that you could rest for and it wouldn’t even make a difference. We have to remember in Muay Thai we are only training for a fight that lasts 10min with 4min of breaks for women & 15min with 8min for a males. Even with the most basic amount of training in Thailand with a couple of sessions off a week is going to be more than what most people do at home and they still fight and become champions.

Im going to ask some world class fighters and trainers that have achieved things in Muay Thai beyond our wildest dreams on their thoughts of over training and if they think its real. They would know right!

Name: Kevin Ross8965_237284733082384_146666849_n
Gym: Combat Sports Academy (CSA)
Nationality: American
Fight Record: 44-12 overall 31-8 professional
Titles: Former WBC Super Lightweight International Champion. Former WBC Welterweight National Champion. Former USMF Super Lightweight Champion. Former FIDAM Welterweight Champion. Current Lion Fight World Champion,

1. Do you think over training is real? If so how do you deal with it? I hear people say “Over training is a myth, it’s called under recovery”, which very well may be true but to me you’re basically just talking about the same things. Regardless I know first hand what it’s like to completely burn myself out and ‘over train’ or if you want ‘under recover’. The problem, I find, is that most people use ‘over training’ as a reason to slack off in the gym. The majority of the time people aren’t even close to over training. I’ve always been the type of person who would rather do too much, than too little. Over the years I have learned to listen to my body a bit more and I try to train a little smarter but there’s a very fine line between doing too much and acting like a bitch.

2. How important are recovery days for you? I pretty much only take one day off a week and I’m usually putting in double days for the rest, when I’m in full on training mode. 10526069_474643139346541_1289641601589320237_nI’m probably the worst person to talk to when it comes to recovery and rest because that is something I lack, always have. I think for everyone it’s different. Some people need to keep pushing and be on the grind constantly, as I do, and that’s works for them, while others can have some days off, light days, etc and perform better. I’ve found that training, along with diet, is never something where one was works for everyone.

3. Do you think taking a session or a day off because you feel over trained is going to impact your fighting? Not at all, if anything it will help. As I said before, however, people tend to start making excuses and being babies just because they are a little sore. It’s the same as the question, ‘are you injured or are you hurt?’, there’s a big difference between the two and 9 times out of 10 you’re just being weak.

Anything else you would like to add? Whether it’s training, diet, recovery, etc, play around with different approaches, tweak them to your specific needs and find what works best for you. It’s always good to get advice from other people but there’s no one way to do anything.10252040_10152023095600952_3433270460486105456_n

Name:Caley reece Gym: Riddlers Gym Nationality: Australian Fight Record: 58 fights 53 wins Titles: WMC state and National titles. 57kg 6 x world Champion

 1. Do you think over training is real? If so how do you deal with it? Absolutely it’s real – I’ve suffered from the effects of overtraining many times. To be honest I’m a prime example of it. I love training, and have high expectations of myself so I tend to do far more than what’s expected, which in the past has been more of a hinder than help. Daz (trainer and husband) is the one to usually pick up on it, telling me a session is needed off or a day and to take it easy as I will just keep pushing and pushing so he watches me closely and will tell me “Cales, that’s enough, it’s time for a day off or morning off” . It’s easy to overtrain in Thailand with the sessions being long, the same and them expecting long runs, sometimes twice a day. Its one of the reasons, I haven’t done lots of long stints there because I feel like I burn out after 2/3 weeks. Especially if you are training for a fight – there’s no taper compared to the western way and i believe to perform well, you need to have that slow “come down” from the hard training which will allow your body to repair and recover before you need to put it through a high level of stress in the ring. I’m certainly not knocking the way Thais train, I just know that two sessions every day at a high intensity for me, I would burn out. When I train, I train hard. I don’t mess around on the bag and go 50%, I don’t clinch at 50% and my padwork is always as best as I can go so if the rest days aren’t there, it soon catches up with me.

1962638_10151946618425952_731530723_n2. How important are recovery days for you? Recovery days and recovery sessions are important for any athlete for both mental and physical recuperation. One can effect the other so we need to have those times where we allow our bodies and minds to rest. It doesn’t just mean our muscles get rest. The toxicity and lactic acids released into your body when you train is constant, so it’s important that we give our organs a time and rest also. A day off and a couple of mornings off a week is what i do teamed with 2/3 recovery sessions at the sauna and pool per week. As I’m getting older, this is far more important also – the old saying quality vs quantity becomes more understandable, especially when the body has been training a long time.

3. Do you think taking a session or a day off because you feel over trained is going to impact your fighting? I used to yes. I used to struggle with it, thinking I will lose fitness but the more i did it (the more Daz made me do it haha) the more I realised, in fact, if anything it helps my body as I don’t have that constant tired feeling when i train. The second half of this year, I slipped back into my old ways of training like a maniac and ended up overtraining, putting too much pressure on myself and my body paid for it mentally and physically. It not only impacted my training but it impacted my life so I’ve had a brutal reminder that more is not better. I have just proved this to myself, that overtraining is not a 10481737_10203920884964819_6373026971192426441_omyth if you are training at higher intensities often. It’s taken some time to recover and next year, I will be going back to the smart way which is hard for me because i live to train but as you get older, you definitely need to train more scientific than just guns a blazing!!

Anything else you would like to add? I have been doing a lot of reading on fatigue and overtraining actually and have come across a good article – http://www.cnelm.com/NutritionPractitioner/Issues/Issue_11_1/Articles/3%20Overtrainingformatted4_IC_ML3.pdf which outlines some information about overtraining and fatigue. It’s important to notice symptoms and not just brush them off because constant tiredness can leave towards almost an illness so it’s best to notice these signs and correct what’s needed before you dig yourself into a hole you don’t want to be in. As we like to say ” better to be safe than sorry” Thanks Tash for a topic that is highly important for fighters to be aware of when they are training. Especially those on a mission to become champions and will do whatever it takes.10410762_1533533296904026_6118001260062335382_n

Name: Darren Reece Position: owner and head trainer Riddlers gym Gym: Riddlers Gym Nationality: Australian

1. Do you think over training is real? If so how do you deal with it? Yes over training is a very real thing. Having lived and trained in Thailand for many years during my fight career I have experienced it first hand though realising so was in hindsight when I became more experienced and learnt that you didn’t have to feel like that to be fighting fit! As a trainer now I try to keep an eye out and take notice on training performance, fatigue levels and mood of my fighters to determine if they are getting over trained, fatigued or perhaps excessively tired from the work/ training combination.

2. Do you think a person who is feeling over trained will gain anything from training or taking a rest? There is definitely a difference between being tired from a hard session or sessions and over training. Sometimes you need to just push through to take you to that next level but then when it is more than that like days on end then I believe taking a rest, active recovery or reducing your workload and intensity to promote some recovery is of great value and benefit and results in the fighter coming back better and stronger.

602333_1402911253299565_553869023_n3. How do you judge if you think someone is over training or needs to ease up a bit? I watch closely and know my fighters. If it’s a one off day from a hard session previous or they had a busy day at work then it’s not so serious and this is where a little mental push will help. If it’s days on end or they’re having a stressful time at work or outside the gym, they’re coming to the gym tired and looking run down and I know what they’re usually like then I often alter a few things. As an example a few of my fighters are tradies or labourers who work outside. If they’ve been working outside in the heat and sun then they are not going to have as much fuel in the tank for training and often after a couple of days of training and work I’ll tell them to have a day off or go do some active recovery and they come back stronger to finish off the week instead of pushing them through and their performance is suffering badly by middle or late in the week. Even for a fighter that is getting to train full time there comes a point after a few sessions that you need to have an easier day or a morning off to allow you to return to optimal performance. Session after session of high level intensity and volume without change is where over training becomes a factor and wears you down.

 4. Do you think your student taking a session or a day off because they feel over trained will impact their fighting? Yes. Yes it will impact in a positive way! If it’s scheduled and needed rest day or session it will result in them coming back to perform better in other sessions rather than just struggling through.. No it doesn’t mean they’ll not be as fit or fight as well which is often in our minds when we are a fighter because let’s look at the big picture.. A fight is for 10 mins or 15 mins of ring and round time. Do we really need to do quadruple that amount training morning and night to make it through the fight? I don’t think so! But in actual fact that morning off, day off or scheduled sessions of high, moderate and light intensity will allow you to train better and higher intensity when you ask 10384738_1469663646624325_2918771479930278830_nyour body to!

 Anything else you would like to add? I have become a big believer in training smart and after years and years of serious Thailand training with crazy volumes I now prefer to train a much smarter way and also utilise modern training methods of sprint training, strength and conditioning and recovery methods. With all these combined together it results in a much better prepared fighter that gets to train with much more variety in their training, less injuries because of the variety, more motivated because of the variety and fighters that are faster,stronger and better athletically repaired! Another thing that is related to this and can be experienced often when training hard or over trained is sickness. I believe it is much more effective to rest for a few days and get better quicker than to try and struggle through making you get sicker and usually for longer trying to train through sick and suffering. You won’t lose much fitness from taking a few days off training because you’re sick… But you will get better quicker and return to normal quicker. Darren Reece.

10411394_682172915165481_5408946277681458187_nName: Nugget McNaught Position: Trainer Gym: Nugget’s Thaiboxing Gym Nationality: Australian

 1. Do you think over training is real? If so how do you deal with it? I think in some cases over training is real, but there is a fine line between using it as an excuse to get out of hard training and actually having nothing left physically or mentally in the tank.

2. Do you think a person who is feeling over trained will gain anything from training or taking a rest? As I said above, there is a fine line and all comes down to how well the trainer knows his student. Some fighters need a push to get through a session especially as you come closer to the bout. Other may need to rest a few days if they truly believe they may have peaked to early or feeling they are starting to get run down. Knowing which line to follow with your student is just a part of being a trainer.

3. How do you judge if you think someone is over training or needs to ease up a 1233362_671200319596074_1367552916419142337_nbit? This is one of those things that separates the good trainers and the great ones. Rule number one as a trainer is knowing your fighter. Measuring previous training sessions leading up to a fight and assessing the standard at certain points of training.

4. Do you think your student taking a session or a day off because they feel over trained will impact their fighting? I would say, it’s the trainers call to decide if the fighter needs a session or day off, not the fighter. But I believe if you know your fighter and you think that he would gain from a sleep in and morning session off, there is nothing wrong with that! As far as the result goes, it’s the fight game and anything can happen. The main thing is that you send your fighter in to the ring in the best condition they could be in.

Blog Interviews by Natasha Sky Dec 2014, Photos From Facebook

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Natasha Sky – Professional Female Muay Thai Fighter from Australia.